From ancient Rome to SoCal: iMOCA’s Philip K. Dick show
iMOCA executive director Shauta Marsh was in Portland last year for a conference when she came upon a group of artists who had invented a religion based on the works of the nominally-Gnostic-but-too-complex-to-describe-using-only-a-few-adjectives sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick. “I wasn’t into what they were offering aesthetically; it was a little too Charlie Manson,” she tells NUVO. “Besides, Dick would have hated that anyone created a religion based on his work.”
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From ancient Rome to SoCal: iMOCA’s Philip K. Dick show

iMOCA executive director Shauta Marsh was in Portland last year for a conference when she came upon a group of artists who had invented a religion based on the works of the nominally-Gnostic-but-too-complex-to-describe-using-only-a-few-adjectives sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick. “I wasn’t into what they were offering aesthetically; it was a little too Charlie Manson,” she tells NUVO. “Besides, Dick would have hated that anyone created a religion based on his work.”

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It is always a pleasure to announce a new book dealing with our favourite author. Anthony Peake published a new biography of PKD. He wrote us a message and said that this book “includes some never-before-published material”. Here is the summary:

Philip K. Dick was a hugely influential writer who drew upon his own life to address the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences of all kinds. He was a prolific author and many of his books were turned into popular films such as Blade Runner, A Scanner Darkly, Total Recall, and Minority Report. This book has been written with the cooperation of several close acquaintances and looks to examine his work as well as the socio-political-cultural environment in which he lived. It will be of great interest to any fan of Philip K. Dick or science fiction in general, as well as anyone who grew up the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s.

It is always a pleasure to announce a new book dealing with our favourite author. Anthony Peake published a new biography of PKD. He wrote us a message and said that this book “includes some never-before-published material”. Here is the summary:

Philip K. Dick was a hugely influential writer who drew upon his own life to address the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences of all kinds. He was a prolific author and many of his books were turned into popular films such as Blade Runner, A Scanner Darkly, Total Recall, and Minority Report. This book has been written with the cooperation of several close acquaintances and looks to examine his work as well as the socio-political-cultural environment in which he lived. It will be of great interest to any fan of Philip K. Dick or science fiction in general, as well as anyone who grew up the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s.

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What do the scanners scan?

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This first thing I thought of when I woke up, after a stressful dream that I can’t remember, was this anecdote from A Scanner Darkly by Philip Dick. As I sleepily steeped my tea waiting to leave for the day I kept running over the theme of the anecdote as if I had the passage memorized. Then before I actually left I pulled the book out of my closet and after some scanning (no pun intended) I found the passage and skimmed it before leaving. Can’t seem to get it out of my head so I figured I’d write it down.

“— this guy,” Luckman was saying, manicuring a box full of grass, hunched over it as Arctor sat across from him, more or less watching, “appeared on TV claiming to be a world-famous impostor. He had posed at one time or another, he told the interviewer, as a great surgeon at Johns Hopkins Medical College, a theoretical submolecular high-velocity particle-research physicist on a federal grant at Harvard, as a Finnish novelist who’d won the Nobel Prize in literature, as a deposed president of Argentina married to —”

“And he got away with all that?” Arctor asked. “He never got caught?”

“The guy never posed as any of those. He never posed as anything but a world-famous impostor. That came out later in the L.A. Times — they checked up. The guy pushed a broom at Disneyland, or had until he read this autobiography about this world-famous impostor — there really was one — and he said, ‘Hell, I can pose as all those exotic dudes and get away with it like he did,’ and then he decided, ‘Hell, why do that; I’ll just pose as another impostor.’ He made a lot of bread that way, the Times said. Almost as much as the real world-famous impostor. And he said it was a lot easier.”