thejollyape
thejollyape:

Do you ever read a book and wonder what the freakin frak everyone else is getting high on? That was “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” for me.
This is supposed to be one of those sci-fi novels that will, if not change at least rock your world. It’s on every damn list of must-reads for the genre. Which makes this so much more awkward, cause…well it kinda sucked. No, that’s not entirely true. It didn’t suck, but it held a lot of elements of suckage.
What I did like was the brief exploration of this future world. And especially the very human study in empathy which was really interesting when it was explored through the relationships between human beings, animals and animate objects (robots). That part was interesting and thought worthy.
Then there was that other part which consisted of disjointed and weak characterisations, and the writer’s own subtle yet irritating misogyny. As an end result this book whose main theme seems to be empathy and compassion failed to make me feel even the slightest sliver of either emotion towards protagonists or the author. 
Still I would actually recommend it. The empathy themes are interesting enough for you to handle the disjointed storytelling and the old school conservatism in regards to gender.  

thejollyape:

Do you ever read a book and wonder what the freakin frak everyone else is getting high on? That was “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” for me.

This is supposed to be one of those sci-fi novels that will, if not change at least rock your world. It’s on every damn list of must-reads for the genre. Which makes this so much more awkward, cause…well it kinda sucked. No, that’s not entirely true. It didn’t suck, but it held a lot of elements of suckage.

What I did like was the brief exploration of this future world. And especially the very human study in empathy which was really interesting when it was explored through the relationships between human beings, animals and animate objects (robots). That part was interesting and thought worthy.

Then there was that other part which consisted of disjointed and weak characterisations, and the writer’s own subtle yet irritating misogyny. As an end result this book whose main theme seems to be empathy and compassion failed to make me feel even the slightest sliver of either emotion towards protagonists or the author. 

Still I would actually recommend it. The empathy themes are interesting enough for you to handle the disjointed storytelling and the old school conservatism in regards to gender.